White Tiger Family Martial Arts
Bak Fu Martial Arts                 Tiger Kids

The kicks of Tae Kwon Do with the forms of Kenpo Karate and Kung Fu

Exercise and self-defense for the whole family

Kenpo - Karate - Kobudo - Tae Kwon Do - Kung Fu - Kali/Escrima DTS

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Internal Kung Fu Techniques

The Bak Fu (White Tiger) style incorpoates aspects of internal Kung Fu systems such as Wing Chun and Hsing-I. This provides a balance for the student between the inner forces and outer (external style) forces.


Kung Fu

Kung fu and wushu are popular terms that have become synonymous with Chinese martial arts. However, the Chinese terms kung fu (Chinese: 功夫 pinyin: gōngfū) and wushu (Traditional Chinese: 武術; Simplified Chinese: 武术) have very distinct connotations. Each term can describe a different martial arts traditions and can also be used in a context without referencing martial arts. Colloquially, kung fu (or gong fu) alludes to any individual accomplishment or cultivated skill. In contrast, wushu is a more precise term that refers to general martial activities. The term wushu has also become the name for a modern sport similar to gymnastics involving the performance of adapted Chinese bare-handed and weapons forms (tàolù 套路) judged to a set of contemporary aesthetic criteria for points.

For more information visit Wikipedia


Shaolin

Ever since 1669, when Huang Zongxi first described Chinese martial arts in terms of a Shaolin or "external" school versus a Wudang or "internal" school, "Shaolin" has been used as a synonym for "external" Chinese martial arts regardless of whether or not the particular style in question has any connection to the Shaolin Monastery. In 1784 the Boxing Classic: Essential Boxing Methods made the earliest extant reference to the Shaolin Monastery as Chinese boxing's place of origin. Since the beginning of the 17th century, the Shaolin Monastery garnered such fame that many martial artists have capitalized on its name by claiming possession of the original, authentic Shaolin teachings.

For more information visit Wikipedia


Wing Chun

Wing Chun, occasionally romanized as Ving Tsun or "Wing Tsun" (literally "spring chant" and alternatively as "forever spring", or substituted with the character for "eternal springtime") is a Chinese martial art that specializes in aggressive close-range combat.

Wing Chun, together with Hung Gar and Choy Lay Fut are given the name "The Three Great Southern Martial Art Schools of the South" because of their origin and popularity in Southern China.

Wing Chun is the original style of Bruce Lee that he used as his foundation to Jeet Kuen Do. Intercept First is a principle of Wing Chun.

For more information visit Wikipedia


Hsing-I

Xingyiquan (Chinese: 形意拳; pinyin: Xíng yì quán; Wade-Giles: Hsing I Ch'üan) is one of the major "internal" (nèijiā) Chinese martial arts. Xingyiquan translates approximately to "Form/Intention Boxing", or "Shape/Will Boxing", and is characterised by aggressive, seemingly linear movements and explosive power. There is no single organisational body governing the teaching of the art, and several variant styles exist.

A Xingyiquan fighter uses coordinated movements to generate bursts of power intended to overwhelm the opponent, simultaneously attacking and defending. Forms vary from school to school, but include barehanded sequences and versions of the same sequences with a variety of weapons. These sequences are based upon the movements and fighting behaviour of a variety of animals. The training methods allow the student to progress through increasing difficulty in form sequences, timing and fighting strategy.

For more information visit Wikipedia


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Copyright (c) 2007 Mitch Mayberry